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Saturday, March 24, 2012

THE REISSUES, THE REPRINTS, AND THE NEWER EDITIONS...

...all reflect a boom in the cookbook publishing business. A paperback
reprint will lower the cost to the purchaser, and also give a publisher
a chance to correct egregious errors or add a postscript. Some will
reissue a book in paper covers with a new layout or photos. Others will
rearrange existing material to present it as more informative text
while keeping the focus tight. Here are some recent "re-editions"...
 
15. THE FRENCH WOMEN DON'T GET FAT COOKBOOK (Atria Books, 2010, 2012;
distr. Simon & Schuster, 298 pages, ISBN 978-1-4391-4897-6, $16 U paper
covers) is by Mireille Guiliano, author of French Women Don't Get Fat.
Not only did we all know she would write a cookbook based on that
bestselling book, but also we knew that it would be in paperback t some
point. Thus, this is the 2012 soft cover re-issue of the hardbound
book. She reiterates how to enjoy food and stay slim, with recipes to
back it up. Nine of these preps had appeared in two of her previous
books. Her organization centres around breakfast, lunch and dinner. Try
haricots verts salad with peaches and almonds, apple compote with
pistachios, quinoa with almonds and hazelnuts and apricots, spaghetti
with lime and arugula, orecchiette with broccoli rabe and sausage, or
vegetable curry. There are shopping lists and chapters dealing with
health concerns. Preparations have their ingredients listed in
avoirdupois measurements, but there is no table of metric equivalents.
Quality/price rating: 89. 
 

16. FISH FOREVER; the definitive guide to understanding, selecting, and
preparing healthy, delicious, and environmentally sustainable seafood
(John Wiley & Sons, 2007, 2012, 438 pages, ISBN 978-1-118-16941-4,
$21.99 US paper covers) is by Paul Johnson, owner of the Monterey Fish
Market and supplier to many top California chefs (Waters, Keller,
Bertolli) and serves on the board of Monterey Bay Aquarium's Seafood
Watch Program. Some of the royalties are being donated to "Save Our
Wild Salmon". This is the paperback reprint of the 2007 hard cover
book. His book tries to show us how to chose seafood that is both
sustainable and healthy, despite many ecological and lifesmart issues.
He tries to find the least-endangered, least-contaminated, and best-
tasting species. There are 70 of these (anchovies, bluefish, squid,
tilapia, clams, weakfish, black sea bass, et al) and 96 recipes to use
them. Did you know that Alaskan Pollock is 40% of all fish caught in US
waters? Just about all of it is frozen and processed to imitation-
seafood (e.g., crab). This is FOUR BILLION pounds annually, and is
mostly sold to restaurants and supermarkets, packaged for the latter as
"breaded fish". He has an appendix dealing with omega-3s and mercury
(called a "balancing act"), raw seafood, a glossary of health concerns,
organic pollutants, fishing and aquaculture methods. The bibliography
lists Internet sites. You could try catfish tacos, Mediterranean baked
cod, minestrone, yellowtail snapper with tomato and tarragon pan sauce,
snapper seviche, and slow-roasted salmon salad. There have been the
inevitable changes since 2007, such as more Pollock turning up on the
shelves and skate is now endangered on the East coast (restos are
encouraged to avoid it). Preparations have their ingredients listed in
avoirdupois measurements, but there is no table of metric equivalents.
Quality/Price Rating: 88.
 
 
 
17. BEER FOR DUMMIES, 2d ed. (John Wiley & Sons, 2012, 340 pages, ISBN
978-1-118-12030-9, $22.99 US paper covers) is by Marty Nachel, a
certified beer judge, and Steve Ettlinger, an author of food books. The
first edition was in 1996, so this is virtually a brand new book since
it is now 15 years later. It is billed as "the fun and friendly guide
to all things beer", with an emphasis on how to taste and evaluate
beer. There are basics on ingredients like hops, malt, and barley, plus
the differences between lagers and ales. Along the way, there are
sections on the best beer festivals, tastings, and events around the
world as well as tips for pouring, storing, and drinking beer like an
expert. New coverage on the various styles of beer found around the
world including: real ale, barrel aged/wood aged beer, organic brews,
and extreme beer. Nachel has some updated profiles on the flavor and
body of each beer, explaining why beers taste the way they do, as well
as their strengths and ideal serving temperatures. He also tells how to
read a label, beer-and-food pairings, and cooking with beer. Recipes
have their ingredients listed in avoirdupois measurements, but there is
no table of metric equivalents. Canada and Mexico get one page each,
with a sidebar dedicated to the LCBO and The Beer Store.
Quality/price rating: 87.
 

18. MY COOKING CLASS: Indian Basics; 85 recipes illustrated step by
step (Firefly, 2011, unpaged, ISBN 978-1-55407-939-1, $24.95 CAN paper
covers) is by Jody Vassallo, an Ayurveda traditional medicine cook.
There are no specific page references here, but each prep is numbered
and indexed. "The recipes are presented in complete visual sequences,
step by step from start to finish." Every utensil is photographed from
above in colour, and the ingredients are shown in the correct quantity
and in the order that it will be used. The book was originally
published in 2010 in French by Marabout, and then later translated.
There are written instructions and tasks are demonstrated. Advice and
variations are also given. It is a good format. There is a glossary,
eight menus, and some notes on Ayurvedic cooking. Useful recipes
include grilled fish in banana leaf, lamb biryani, butter chicken,
chewy spiced yogurt cake, and a variety of dals. Preparations have
their ingredients listed in both metric and avoirdupois measurements,
but there is no table of equivalents. Quality/price rating: 88.
 
 
 

19. MY COOKING CLASS: preserving basics; 77 recipes illustrated step by
step (Firefly, 2011, unpaged, ISBN 978-1-55407-942-1, $24.95 CAN paper
covers) is by Jody Vassallo, who has written over two dozen cookbooks.
There are no specific page references here, but each prep is numbered
and indexed. "The recipes are presented in complete visual sequences,
step by step from start to finish." Every utensil is photographed from
above in colour, and the ingredients are shown in the correct quantity
and in the order that it will be used. The book was originally
published in 2011 in French by Marabout, and then later translated.
There are written instructions and tasks are demonstrated. Advice and
variations are also given. It is a good format. There are food charts,
pectin charts and storage charts. Useful recipes include spreads
(curds, butters, chocolate), jellies, marmalades, mustards, chutneys
and relishes. Preparations have their ingredients listed in both metric
and avoirdupois measurements, but there is no table of equivalents.
Quality/price rating: 88.
 
 
 
20. PROFESSIONAL EVENT COORDINATION. 2d ed. (John Wiley & Sons, 2012,
492 pages, ISBN 978-0-470-56071-6, $70 US hard covers) is by Julia
Rutherford Silvers, an academic and industry consultant to the
hospitality trade. She's a multiple award winner who conducts workshops
and lectures around the world. The book was first published nine years
ago in 2003, and here has been completely overhauled. She covers a
range from small parties of ten to large corporate events for 10,000.
This includes her takes on design, project management, site selection,
site development, safety and security issues, food and beverage
management, and entertainment. It is a good reference work for
practitioners and students, with case studies, forms and checklists,
online resources, and discussion questions. New in the previous decade
have been such things as mobile devices, virtual conferencing, social
media, and the need for green and sustainable practices, and these are
admirably covered here. There are both suggestions for additional
reading and a bibliography. Quality/price rating: 87.
 

21. MEALS IN MINUTES: EASY DESSERTS (Weldon Owens, 2007, 2011, 112
pages, ISBN 978-1-61628-215-8, $9.99 US paper covers) comes form the
previously published "Desserts" in the Food Made Fast series. Okay, so
now everything is both easy and fast. The recipes were developed by
Elinor Klivans. Everything is either 15 minutes (hands-on time) or 30
minutes total – the book is arranged that way. There is a buttery
cookie dough to freeze and use in many of the dessert recipes found
here. And there are nine other preps to make that can be stored. Strewn
about are tips, suggestions and ideas on planning. A well-stocked
pantry is suggested. Preparations have their ingredients listed in both
metric and avoirdupois measurements, but there is no table of metric
equivalents. Try cherry clafoutis, spicy chocolate truffles, toasted
almond gelato, blackberry fool, or hot fudge parfaits. Quality/price
rating: 89.
 

22. PRAIRIE HOME BREADS; 150 splendid recipes from America's
breadbasket (Harvard Common Press, 2001, 2011, 230 pages, ISBN 978-1-
55832-173-1, $14.95 US paper covers) is by Judith M. Fertig, who has
had Beard and IACP cookbook nominations. She specializes in Midwestern
US regional cuisine. The book was originally published in 2001, and
here, a decade later, is the paperback reprint. It is a farmland bread
book, full of rusticity. There are whole-grain breads, Sunday dinner
breads, breakfast muffins, scones, dessert breads, teatime treats and
pastries. Biscuits, crackers, popovers, coffee cakes, rolls and buns
complete the picture. Preparations have their ingredients listed in
avoirdupois measurements, but there is no table of metric equivalents.
This is a very interesting collection of recipes, with some historical
preps that have been updated. Try Russian Mennonite sour rye bread,
herbed polenta bread, pizza pollotate, Amish pinwheel bread, Dakota
territory sourdough potato bread, or spoon rolls. Quality/price rating:
88.
 

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